This will be our first Thanksgiving with Jenn in several years. Perhaps it was one too many years of dry turkey and runny mashed potatoes at my family’s place in downstate Illinois that soured her on the holiday… I think the real reason she’s spent the last 5 Thanksgivings visiting schools is because it’s such a great week to travel internationally. The international terminals of the airports are empty, since most US travelers are travelling domestically. International air fares are generally reasonable at this time, as well. It’s a better time than summer, since you can get a feel for school and city with students around. You may also be able to audit a class. since they’re in session.

It’s looking likely that the ’21 – ‘22 school year will have some resemblance to normalcy, so that may be when Jenn and Ellie do most of Ellie’s school visits too. It will be after Ellie has applied but will help her firm up her top choices. One aspect Ellie has been evaluating are the options for studying abroad offered by the different schools.

We’ve met so many students who went to a US university intent on studying abroad but were unable to due to high costs and/or logistical challenges.  Since the European Commission has goals around internationalization, there are options and programs, such as Erasmus+, offered through the EU and the universities to make studying abroad more feasible and affordable for students attending college in Europe.

The first option we’ll explore is when time abroad is part of the program. In this example, courses are held at different campuses with the students moving to them on a schedule in groups.

ESCP Europe’s Bachelor of Management is a 3 year program spent in 3 different countries. All students start in London for the first year. The second year students choose between Paris, Madrid, or Turin (though Turin is the only campus that offers the program entirely in English). Students meet back in Berlin to finish the program for their third year.

For master’s programs, the Erasmus Mundus programs are a great place to start looking at “built in” study abroad. Erasmus Mundus Joint Master Degree (EMJMD), is an integrated, international study program, where students study at more than one university location. The Beyond the States database lists 153 programs across many different areas featuring multiple campuses (to find them search under the Erasmus Mundus General Area of Study field). Some Erasmus Mundus programs include internships as well.

For example, this Master of Science in Viticulture and Enology has a first year in Montpellier, France, then students study at a partner school in places like Lisbon, Milan, Madrid, or Turin, Italy, based on the student’s interest in winemaking or in the wine business.

Another approach for studying abroad is to become an exchange student. As an exchange student, you can study abroad for one semester (sometimes more) at one of your faculty’s partner universities. The first step to check your faculty or International Office to see what’s available.

The advantages of the exchange student route are that many practical matters have already been dealt with (e.g. exemption from local tuition fees, recognition of credits, and sometimes even accommodation). The disadvantage of an exchange is that your choices are limited to the current partner universities.

For example, if you were a bachelor’s student at Erasmus University Rotterdam in the area of School of Social and Behavioral Sciences, you‘d have 71 different options to choose from ranging from James Cook University on the north coast of Australia to Western Washington University in Washington state in the US. Master’s students in the same faculty, the Department of Public Policy, have 8 options ranging from KU Leuven in Belgium to University of Geneva in Switzerland.

. Erasmus+ provides bachelor’s and master’s degree students the opportunity to study abroad in Europe for three to 12 months. You can take part in study abroad at any time during your degree after your first year although it will depend on the structure of your degree and the arrangements your university has with its partners.

This all sounds expensive for US students. Is it? No, that’s the best part! In general, the student continues to pay tuition at their home school only and doesn’t pay additional tuition to the second school.  Further, when participating in an Erasmus + program, there are opportunities to apply for stipends and grants.

Internships are another great way to get international exposure, not to mention professional experience! Like studying abroad, these can often be done through your university or Erasmus +. Erasmus+ has a page of internships here. Many universities have mandatory internships with an opportunity to complete them abroad. Additionally, universities often have partnerships with multinational companies such as at Copenhagen Business School.

We often have students come to us and saying they must study in France, Italy, or even these days, Prague. The tremendous study abroad opportunities are one reason we encourage students not to have tunnel vision on one European destination for their main program. They will have the opportunity to design their own plan to spend time in their dream destination, even if not for their full degree because of these extensive studies abroad options.